Mary Sue Hubbard

L. Ron Hubbard's third wife, she went to jail for her role in the Snow White espionage conspiracy.

More about Mary Sue Hubbard

GO Document

November 4, 1974: Mary Sue Hubbard writes a document to other Scientology officials saying that Scientology must avoid being labeled a political group. The solution: "All political activity is to be carried on via front groups."

GO Letter

October 21, 1975: Cindy Raymond sends a letter to various Guardian's Office officials, enclosing Michael Meisner's letter from the 13th (dealing with a transcript of an interview between Gene Allard and California Deputy Attorney General Lawrence Tapper) and also appending stolen government documents. Among the recipients: Michael Taylor, Henning Heldt, Richard Weigand, Gregory Willardson, Jane Kember, Mo Budlong, and Mary Sue Hubbard.

GO Document

February 27, 1976: Joe Lisa, assistant guardian for information at Flag, writes Jimmy Mulligan, an aide to Mary Sue Hubbard, that "a letter is going out to the Sun (one of those 5 day warning letters). Basically they are going to be warned not to print anymore ... or else we will sue." He also says, "Yesterday we turned over to PR scandal material for a Br I PR (branch one) attack on the medicos in these here parts. I am also having some follow up on this and am drawing up a project to get a large scale attack going on nursing homes, medical centers, mental health and psychiatric clinics. I'll be sending a copy up lines as soon as I get that completed."

GO Report

February 28, 1976: Mary Sue Hubbard writes her assessment of the Clearwater scene to Dick Weigand, deputy guardian for information, U.S. Of Mayor Cazares, she says: "He thought he had an excellent handle on us politically and was using it to gain PR for himself politically. He has nowhere to go except in the political arena. We were the football that blew up on him when we did not prove out to be tied to some gambling or other interests." She gives her assessments of reporters Snyder and Sableman and of The St. Petersburg Times. "Of all," she said, "I consider the SPT (Times) to be the most dangerous. Poynter obviously feels he owns this neck of the woods morally, spiritually, politically and otherwise." She was referring to Nelson Poynter, the Times' chairman of the board.

GO Document

May 12, 1977: Dick Weigand replies to an inquiry from Mary Sue Hubbard about Scientologists who had been directed to infiltrate Florida newspapers and public organizations: "Basically the scene is that we had two agents one in the CW Sun and one in the CW Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber of Commerce agent was used in the Easter Seal operation, not the CW Sun agent but the clincher is that both of these agents were in the AMA and had previously been blown." He says the liabilities of the situation are that agents Martin and Phillips could be traced back to Scientologist Mike Meisner, who has been stealing documents for Scientology in Washington.

GO Document

October 31, 1977: Mary Sue Hubbard writes to Richard Weigand proposing various aspects of the ongoing cover-up operation for Michael Meisner. She suggests that the following scenario be considered: Meisner (whom she refers to by the letter "H" for the code name Herbert which Meisner had assumed since going underground after the issuance of his arrest warrant) was having marital trouble and was jealous that his wife was being more productive than he. Therefore, he took it upon himself to organize the burglaries of government buildings and thefts of documents from those buildings to prove that he too could produce for the Guardian's Office. She instructed the defendant Weigand that "[i]f this seems workable" then Meisner should be ordered to work on the details of this aspect of that plan.

Clearwater Police Dept. Report Number SR3.1 R (0-2a)

February 6, 1984: Clearwater Police Dept. Report Number SR3.1 R (0-2a) This report is concerning some information from the Ontario Provincial Police - Const. Bruce Burley. Const. Bruce Burley stated lawyers for Mary Sue Hubbard wanted to plea bargain his client. Also Const. Burley had documents to prove Hubbard is not a Doctor of Philosophy. Const. Burley agreed to send these documents to me, (Lt. Emmons)

Mary Sue Hubbard in the News

Date Titlesort icon Blurb Tags
June 24, 1990 Los Angeles Times: Burglaries and Lies Paved a Path to Prison A web of criminal conspiracy to discredit the church's foes resulted in prison sentences for 11 top-ranking Scientologists. crimes, harassment, Los Angeles, CA, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press
October 24, 1984 Son of Church Founder Is Sued by Stepmother The wife of the founder of Scientology, L. Ron Hubbard, has filed a $5 million suit against Mr. Hubbard's son, charging "massive fraud" in his 1982 effort to have his father declared legally dead or mentally incompetent. The suit was filed by Mr. Hubbard's third wife, Mary Sue Hubbard, the stepmother of Mr. Hubbard's oldest son, Ronald DeWolf. lawsuits, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press
January 15, 1983 Scientologist Faces Jail Term Mary Sue Hubbard, 51, wife of the founder of the Church of Scientology, is scheduled to begin serving a four-year federal prison sentence for her role in a conspiracy to burglarize federal buildings, following the failure of a series of appeals. She was the last of eight Scientologists to be sentenced in a 5-year-old case that grew out of efforts by church members to burglarize federal buildings and illegally obtain government records on the church. crimes, Guardian Office, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press
January 8, 1983 Wife of Scientology Founder Jailed Mary Sue Hubbard, whose husband founded the Church of Scientology, was sentenced yesterday to four years in prison for her role in directing a conspiracy to steal U.S. Government documents about the church. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson also fined the wife of L. Ron Hubbard $10,000 after telling her she had committed "not only a serious but a heinous offence." The judge said she could not accept Mrs. Hubbard's contention that she had violated the law because she believed the federal Government was harassing the church. "Your crime cannot be excused for perceived harassment," the judge said. "I must consider how your crime has affected your fellow citizens." Ten others who were previously convicted for their roles in the church conspiracy have been sentenced to prison terms ranging from one to six years. crimes, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press, Washington DC
April 20, 1982 Scientology Founder's Wife Loses Final High Court Plea, Faces Prison The Supreme Court let stand the convictions of two former leaders of the Church of Scientology, rejecting their final efforts to contest the legality of the FBI's search of the church's Los Angeles offices in 1977. The court's action apparently clears the way for Mary Sue Hubbard - the one-time "controller" for the church group and wife of its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, who was not charged in the case - to begin serving a five-year prison term on a conspiracy charge. crimes, IRS, lawsuits, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press
December 7, 1979 Wife of Scientology Founder is Sentenced to Prison A federal judge yesterday sentenced Mary Sue Hubbard, wife of the founder of the Church of Scientology, to a maximum five-year prison term for conspiring to steal government documents about the church. Judge Richey also fined Mrs. Hubbard the maximum $10,000 and directed her to report to prison in 10 days. The judge also sentencd three other Scientologists to four years in prison and fined them $10,000 each. Five other Scientologists are expected to be sentenced today. crimes, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press, Washington DC
October 9, 1979 9 Scientologists OK Conviction So They Can Appeal Nine leaders of the Church of Scientology, in a rare legal maneuver, have agreed to be found guilty by a federal judge on reduced charges of conspiracy and theft as an outgrowth of their long battle with the federal government over allegedly stolen U.S. documents. crimes, Guardian Office, Henning Heldt, Los Angeles, CA, Mary Sue Hubbard, Press, Richard Weigand

Mary Sue Hubbard in the News

Date Title Blurb Tags
February 19, 1985 Church of Scientology of California And Mary Sue Hubbard CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA and Mary Sue Hubbard, petitioners v. SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES Mary Sue Hubbard
February 6, 1984 Clearwater Police Dept. Report Number SR3.1 R (0-2a) Clearwater Police Dept. Report Number SR3.1 R (0-2a) This report is concerning some information from the Ontario Provincial Police - Const. Bruce Burley. Const. Bruce Burley stated lawyers for Mary Sue Hubbard wanted to plea bargain his client. Also Const. Burley had documents to prove Hubbard is not a Doctor of Philosophy. Const. Burley agreed to send these documents to me, (Lt. Emmons) Mary Sue Hubbard, police report
January 7, 1983 Mary Sue Hubbard Sentenced To Serve Four Years In Federal Correctional Institute Mary Sue Hubbard sentenced to serve four years in Federal Correctional Institute, Lexington, KY, and fined $10,000. Sentencing was delayed after 1979 conviction pending an exhaustive study of her medical condition. Mary Sue Hubbard
May 1, 1980 Mary Sue Hubbard, Controller, Church, David Miscavige Mary Sue Hubbard ousted as Controller of Church of Scientology by David Miscavige. [May 80 - exact date unknown] Mary Sue Hubbard
October 26, 1979 Mary Sue Hubbard, al., Washington DC Federal Court, Judge Charles E. Richey Mary Sue Hubbard et al. are convicted in Washington DC Federal Court by Judge Charles E. Richey. Mary Sue Hubbard
October 8, 1979 Mary Sue Hubbard, al., trial Mary Sue Hubbard et al. agree to plead guilty to one count each in return for a stipulation of evidence rather than a trial. Mary Sue Hubbard
October 6, 1979 Mary Sue Hubbard and 8 Other Scientology Executives Admit Massive Conspiracy Hubbard's wife Mary Sue and eight other Scientology executives signed a 282-page (plus exhibits) Stipulation of Evidence that detailed the government's case. That document details the burglaries, forgeries, conspiracies, to obstruct justice and other crimes committed. crimes, Guardian Office, Mary Sue Hubbard
August 15, 1978 Mary Sue Hubbard, 8, theft, burglary, conspiracy, charges Mary Sue Hubbard and 8 others are indicted by a federal grand jury on theft, burglary, conspiracy, and related charges. Mary Sue Hubbard
January 2, 1978 Mary Sue Hubbard, Los Angeles Mary Sue Hubbard moves to Los Angeles. Los Angeles, Mary Sue Hubbard
October 31, 1977 GO Document Mary Sue Hubbard writes to Richard Weigand proposing various aspects of the ongoing cover-up operation for Michael Meisner. She suggests that the following scenario be considered: Meisner (whom she refers to by the letter "H" for the code name Herbert which Meisner had assumed since going underground after the issuance of his arrest warrant) was having marital trouble and was jealous that his wife was being more productive than he. Therefore, he took it upon himself to organize the burglaries of government buildings and thefts of documents from those buildings to prove that he too could produce for the Guardian's Office. She instructed the defendant Weigand that "[i]f this seems workable" then Meisner should be ordered to work on the details of this aspect of that plan. Guardian Office, Mary Sue Hubbard