crimes

Scientology has a long, well-documented history of breaking the law.

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Is Scientology breaking the law? There's evidence that they are.

Scientology's Crimes

Learn about allegations - and convictions - of criminal activity by Scientology organizations and executives.

Guardian Office Memo Requests Update on Stealing Department of Justice Files

October 3, 1975: A Guardian's Office memo is sent to Richard Weigand requesting a compliance report on target 17 of GO 1361. (Target 17 directed the infiltration and theft of files relating to Scientology from the Tax Division or the United States Department of Justice in Washington, D.C.) Weigand added a handwritten note to the memo that target 17 "is almost done" in Washington DC, but that six more weeks would be needed to complete the target at the Justice Department in Los Angeles.

Los Angeles Police - Public Statement Regarding Eugene Ingram's Wiretapping

April 23, 1985: A public announcement by Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates disavowing any cooperation with Eugene Ingram, longtime Scientology agent, who claimed to have obtained a letter from the LAPD authorizing Ingram to eavesdrop on others.

Affidavit of Margery Wakefield

April 13, 1990: Testimony tells the story of her experiences in Scientology.">Margery Wakefield's affidavit describes illicit activities, hearing plans to murder individuals, and false imprisonment by the Church of Scientology.

crimes in the News

Date Titlesort icon Blurb Tags
September 22, 1999 Jail sought against French Scientologist Reuters: Jail sought against French Scientologist crimes
December 14, 1998 At a Loss To Make Legal Findings The saga of Scientology's legal skirmishes in France date back at least as far as 1978, when the organisation's founder, L Ron Hubbard, was condemned in absentia for fraud. But if the latest legal row involving Scientology is far from being the first, it is surely one of the most bizarre. In October, Le Figaro newspaper revealed papers in a long-running legal action against the self-proclaimed church had gone missing, provoking outrage from lawyers working on the case. Justice Minister Elizabeth Guigou considered the incident serious enough to order an internal inquiry. Even before this, however, there were signs something was amiss. crimes, France
December 6, 1998 The Life and Death of a Scientologist Within 17 days, McPherson - who'd spent most of her adult life and tens of thousands of dollars as a devotee of Hubbard's teachings - would be dead. The once-voluptuous 36-year-old - she stood 5 feet 9 and wore a size 12 dress - lost an estimated 40 to 50 pounds during the ordeal, dropping to 108, her bruised body pocked by insect bites and scabs. She was never seen by a licensed physician during that time. Clearwater, crimes, Lisa McPherson, Press
December 1, 1998 Church pleads innocent to criminal charges St. Petersburg Times: Church pleads innocent to criminal charges crimes
December 1, 1998 Scientology Pleads Not Guilty in 1995 Death The Church of Scientology pleaded not guilty today to criminal charges in connection with the 1995 death of a member whose family maintained that she had been held against her will by the church for 17 days. The church's Flag Service Organization, its chief operating arm here, was charged in the case this month with abuse or neglect of a disabled adult and practicing medicine without a license, both felonies. No individuals were charged. Clearwater, crimes, Lisa McPherson, Press
November 23, 1998 State Takes Middle Road Against Scientology The Church of Scientology Flag Service Organization Inc. was charged with abuse and/or neglect of a disabled adult and practicing medicine without a license. Though serious, the lawyers said, the charges carry less emotion than manslaughter and less of a stigma for Scientology than if church members faced individual charges that could put them in prison. Because the Scientology entity was charged corporately, no single person faces prosecution or punishment. "They probably determined that this is the charge that can be best proved, most easily proved, as opposed to manslaughter," said Michael Cheek, a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Clearwater. Clearwater, crimes, Lisa McPherson, Press
November 14, 1998 Scientology Charged in Member's Death The Church of Scientology in Clearwater has been charged with criminal neglect and practicing medicine without a license in the 1995 death of Lisa McPherson, the mentally disturbed Scientologist who turned to outsiders for help before church officials intervened and placed her under their care. Unlicensed Scientology staffers "medicated her without her consent," isolated her and took other measures to treat her physical and mental condition at Scientology's Fort Harrison Hotel, according to an affidavit filed Friday in Pinellas-Pasco Circuit Court. Clearwater, crimes, deaths, Lisa McPherson
November 14, 1998 Florida Charges Scientology In Church Member's Death Florida prosecutors filed criminal charges against the Church of Scientology in connection with the death of a church member while she was under the care of Scientologists three years ago. The church's Flag Service Organization, its chief operating arm in Clearwater, Fla., was charged with abuse or neglect of a disabled adult and with the unauthorized practice of medicine in the death of the church member, Lisa McPherson, 36. Clearwater, crimes, Lisa McPherson, Press
November 9, 1998 French Justice In Scientology Row French justice will face accusations today that it has been manipulated by the Church of Scientology as the Paris Appeal Court rules on whether to continue a 15-year investigation into the organisation. The disappearance of some of the investigating magistrate's files has fuelled the suspicions of anti-sect campaigners before the hearing. They believe Scientologists have infiltrated the upper echelons of the legal system, using their influence to put pressure on judges and block inquiries. crimes, Paris, Press
October 20, 1998 Butterworth Offers Help in Scientologist Case Florida Attorney General Bob Butterworth has offered "the complete services of my office" to help investigate the 1995 death of Scientologist Lisa McPherson. McPherson, 36, had been under the care of fellow Scientologists who tried for 17 days to nurse her through a psychotic outburst at the Fort Harrison Hotel, Scientology's retreat in downtown Clearwater. Although physically healthy when she entered the hotel, she was dead on arrival after Scientologists drove her to a Pasco County hospital. Clearwater, crimes, Lisa McPherson, Press

crimes in the News

Datesort icon Title Blurb Tags
September 30, 1996 Patrice Vic Trial Begins - Scientology Executive Charged with Manslaughter Trial begins in the death of Patrice Vic. Scientology executive Jean-Jacques Mazier is charged with manslaughter, and 22 other Scientologists also face charges. crimes, deaths, France, Patrice Vic, Press
April 13, 1990 Affidavit of Margery Wakefield Testimony tells the story of her experiences in Scientology.">Margery Wakefield's affidavit describes illicit activities, hearing plans to murder individuals, and false imprisonment by the Church of Scientology. crimes, Documents, false imprisonment, Margery Wakefield
April 23, 1985 Los Angeles Police - Public Statement Regarding Eugene Ingram's Wiretapping A public announcement by Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates disavowing any cooperation with Eugene Ingram, longtime Scientology agent, who claimed to have obtained a letter from the LAPD authorizing Ingram to eavesdrop on others. crimes, Documents, Eugene Ingram, harassment, Los Angeles, CA
August 3, 1980 Scientologist Elizabeth Eagleton Wiegand, Senator Eagleton, Stephen E. Poludniak, St. Louis. Libby Wiegand, $220,000, company;, Scientologist Elizabeth Eagleton Wiegand, niece of Senator Eagleton, and her attorney Stephen E. Poludniak are arrested and charged with extortion and conspiracy in St. Louis. Libby Wiegand had threatened to publicize embarassing information about the senator unless he purchased $220,000 of her stock in a family company; he refused to purchase the stock because he believed the money would go to Scientology. Although Scientology denied any involvement at the time, they later linked it to a Guardian's Office operation in their IRS Form 1023 declaration. crimes
October 6, 1979 Mary Sue Hubbard and 8 Other Scientology Executives Admit Massive Conspiracy Hubbard's wife Mary Sue and eight other Scientology executives signed a 282-page (plus exhibits) Stipulation of Evidence that detailed the government's case. That document details the burglaries, forgeries, conspiracies, to obstruct justice and other crimes committed. crimes, Guardian Office, Mary Sue Hubbard
October 6, 1976 Michael Meisner Moves to a Scientology-Rented Apartment; Coverup Continues Michael Meisner moves into an apartment at 444 South Burlington Street in Los Angeles. The apartment was rented by Paul Poulon (Collections Officer for the Information Bureau); the Guardian's Office wanted to reduce expenses and it was cheaper for Meisner to hide out in an apartment than in hotel rooms. Meisner spends most of his days at local libraries doing research on the security of government buildings, in order to support one of the cover-up stories, _viz._, that he had entered various government buildings to do an expose on the lack of security. Cinty Raymond and Meisner meet approximately twice a week to discuss the ongoing cover-up. crimes, Guardian Office, Los Angeles, CA, Michael Meisner
September 28, 1976 Mo Budlong writes to Richard Weigand, describing a plan for hiding Michael Meisner from his arrest warrant Mo Budlong writes to Richard Weigand, describing a plan for hiding Michael Meisner from his arrest warrant. This constitutes conspiracy, harboring a fugitive, and obstructing justice. crimes, Guardian Office, Michael Meisner
October 3, 1975 Guardian Office Memo Requests Update on Stealing Department of Justice Files A Guardian's Office memo is sent to Richard Weigand requesting a compliance report on target 17 of GO 1361. (Target 17 directed the infiltration and theft of files relating to Scientology from the Tax Division or the United States Department of Justice in Washington, D.C.) Weigand added a handwritten note to the memo that target 17 "is almost done" in Washington DC, but that six more weeks would be needed to complete the target at the Justice Department in Los Angeles. crimes, Guardian Office, Richard Weigand, Washington DC
September 21, 1975 Scientologists Commended for Breaking into Government Offices Gregory Willardson writes a CSW (Completed Staff Work) to Jane Kember and requests commendations and awards for various staff members who had been involved in executing GO 1361 (which directed breaking into government offices and stealing documents), including Cindy Raymond. crimes, Guardian Office, Jane Kember
October 10, 1972 Guardian's Office Weekly Report Directs Attacks on Paulette Cooper Scientology Guardian's Office Weekly Intelligent Report notes that Paulette Cooper is "still actively attacking Scientology" and lists three "handling" actions, including giving New York Scientologists orders to "attack her in as many ways as possible"; this item says that action has already been taken on "wide-scale exposure of PC's sex life." crimes, Guardian Office, harassment, New York, Paulette Cooper